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Detroit Restaurant Experts Air Their Biggest Dining Grievances of 2018

It’s tradition

Just say the word “vegan.” It’s shorter.
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As is tradition at Eater, we closed out the year by surveying local food writers and our own staff on various restaurant-related topics, and publishing their responses throughout the week. Next up: Local food writers share their opinions about the trends and experiences that they would like to leave behind in 2018 AKA the annual airing of restaurant grievances. Readers, feel free to share your thoughts below.

Melody Baetens, Features Reporter, Detroit News:

One of them was these food festivals that couldn’t get their act together. Many were fine, but others suffered from lack of organization which resulted in long lines and a lot of unhappy people.

Brittany Hutson, Contributor, Eater Detroit:

While it’s great that Detroit is getting national attention as a travel destination, I, for one, got fatigued over the “best places to eat” listicles that were geared to tourists. A lot of them were rudimentary and not a true representation of the dynamic food scene here.

Dorothy Hernandez, Contributor, Eater Detroit:

HOW RESTAURANTS ARE REALLY LOUD AND YOU HAVE TO YELL AT YOUR DINING COMPANION IF YOU WANT TO HAVE A CONVERSATION. WHAT? WHAT DID YOU SAY?

Brenna Houck, Editor, Eater Detroit:

The myth of the soft opening. If anyone can walk into the business and have a meal, it’s just open. I love vegan food, but the rise of the the phrase “plant-based” as a replacement for the term “vegan” drives me insane. Restaurants that have food that should be shareable but is served in such a way that it’s not easily shared. I’m all for do-it-yourself dining, but please don’t make your customer cut their own pizza without providing the appropriate tools to do so. That’s a psychological experiment, not a pleasant meal.

Nick Britsky, Host, Nick Drinks at Night:

Lazy fast casual is my biggest grievance. Spots like Gogi Seoul Kitchen in Royal Oak were high on my list of exciting new opens. But one dimensional flavors, lack of staffing, and questionable sanitation killed that excitement fast.

Serena Maria Daniels, Founder/Editor, Tostada Magazine:

Straws. I have a hard time understanding why Detroiters seem to be so resistant to the no-straws policy. I totally understand the implications for people with disabilities who rely on the use of straws, that’s fair. However, I think this region could stand to get on board with regard to environmental issues.

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