clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Industry Experts on Their 2014 Dining Breakups

As is the tradition at Eater, our closeout of the year is a survey of friends, industry types, and bloggers. We've already covered the restaurant standbys, top newcomers, 2014 in one word, best dining neighborhood, biggest dining surprises, and the single best meal of the year. Now, it's time for restaurant and dining trend breakups. Readers, please leave your thoughts in the comments.EOY Small

Q: Were there any restaurants or dining trends you broke up with in 2014?

Steve Wilke, Editor Hour DetroitSorry to be so nice, but I can't say anything in particular really bugged me. Maybe the long waits? But that's a good thing.

Courtney Ochab, Editor Detroit Beer PressDirty draft beer lines. I had a friend tell me "beer is food" and I believe that to the highest degree. I don't want to order a glass of bacteria when I ask for a craft beer. I also have a high regard for the breweries that craft their product and to ruin something so great, by putting it through a dirty draft line. Yeah, it's over at that point.

Victoria Trudeau, Former Editor Eater DetroitNo reservations, or not enough of them. I get it, these new places are all super hot and super busy, but trying to figure out whether or not I need to eat a small meal before heading out to dinner to account for the 1-2 hour wait for a table (when you can even start ordering actual food) is a pain...especially because most of them have no actual waiting area for guests. In a state with 6 month winters. Really?!

Brenna Houck, Editor Eater Detroit: Anything vegetarian option at a restaurant that's called the "hippie (insert type of food here)" is my pet peeve. Don't make people feel awkward for wanting to order something off your menu without meat.

Detroit Foodie: Ridiculously priced pop­up dinners! Since when did the ‘norm' become $50 per person?!?!?

Chow Down DetroitI broke up with Joe Muer's.

Hannah Lowe, Freelance Journalist: Too much salt. I think some folks are scared of the dreaded "under-seasoning" but then dishes can be in-your-face salt, no flavor—just salt.

Kat Rembacki, Editor Core DetroitRestaurants that don't accept credit cards. I almost never carry cash, and it's a huge bummer to have to hit the ATM to pay for lunch.

Josh Smith, Reader: [The] Birmingham restaurant scene. It's changed and not as unique as it once was.

Sign up for the newsletter Sign up for the Eater Detroit newsletter

The freshest news from the local food world